Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Place Value Deck Activites Part 1

I have created 3 different decks of cards that include all numbers from 0-120.  Click here to check out pictures of the three different decks.  Here are some of the activities I do with these decks.

Compare

This is an easy game that kids will be familiar with the format of. It is played much like the game war. Two or more players flip over a card and tell what number they have. The person with the largest number gets all of the cards. You can play this game with any of these card decks depending on what skills you want your students to work on. You may have one pair who is only using the cards up to 20 while another pair uses the cards from 50-100 while another pair uses an entire deck. It is a very easy game to differentiate by changing the range of numbers offered or by changing the deck. It looks like everyone is playing the same game in the room but there are many changes that can be made to make this game easier or more challenging.

Compare  Using <, >, =

Don't these look like fun?  Head to TPT to pick up a copy for yourself!

This is an easy game that kids will be familiar with the format of. It is played much like the game war. Two or more players flip over a card and tell what number they have. The person with the largest number gets all of the cards. You can play this game with any of these card decks depending on what skills you want your students to work on. You may have one pair who is only using the cards up to 20 while another pair uses the cards from 50-100 while another pair uses an entire deck. It is a very easy game to differentiate by changing the range of numbers offered or by changing the deck. It looks like everyone is playing the same game in the room but there are many changes that can be made to make this game easier or more challenging.

Ordering Sequential and Non-Sequential Numbers


A natural extension of comparing numbers under 120 is the ability to put them in order. These decks are great for practicing ordering sequential and non-sequential numbers. I use deck A to do this until kids show some fluency with the activity and then move to deck C. Some kids in one classroom might still be working on deck A while others work on deck C. Another thing to consider is the number of cards you give each student. Starts with 3-4 and gradually increase until you are giving them around 10.

When kids have the cards in order (especially the sequential ones!) I often have them read them to me from smallest to largest and then from largest to smallest. If they are sequential, this is great counting practice (both forward and back) and is particularly useful when you are having them pull through a decade number. If they are non-sequential it is still a great way for them to practice reading numbers.

 
Do your students need more practice with this skill? 

If you want to have these decks be a part of your math instruction, you can head to TPT to pick up your own copy (THEY ARE ON SALE!).  There is a large sample file you can download for free to get a better idea of how you will use these in your classroom.

Want to see more ways I use this deck?  HEAD OVER TO PART 2!

Looking for a similar deck of cards to use with older students?  Check out this post!

2 comments:

  1. Your pack is amazing! Thank you again!!! I'll definitely be using it this September when we start up again.
    Grade ONEderful
    Ruby Slippers Blog Designs

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    1. I hope your students love it as much as mine do!

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